Category Archives: Special Needs

A Golden Opportunity to Review!

 

lds.org, colored by Cara Lu, age 7

from lds.org, colored by Cora Lu, age 7

You’ve put up your visual aids one by one, and conveyed to little minds a memorable gospel truth. Now it’s time to take down those visual aids and either set up for the next wave of Primary children coming in the next hour, or pack them away in your Sunday bag.

Take this time as a valuable opportunity to review your lesson as you take down the visual aids! Talk through each visual aid and remind them of its meaning. It’s a basic educational principle that reviewing helps cement the message. You’ll have the children’s attention with the action at the front of the room, and you won’t have to be in a rush to break down after your lesson is over. Better for them, better for you!

-Marci

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Filed under Activity, Lesson, Special Needs, Teacher Support

The Power of Music and Sign Language in the home, community and Primary classes

ocdeaf.org

ocdeaf.org

Today’s guest author is Pamela, aka Grammy Pammy, whose motto is Make your influence felt in a positive way. She writes:

Our two oldest grandsons were diagnosed with autism when they were very young.  Aunts, uncles and grandparents rallied to support by learning enough American Sign Language (ASL) to communicate with the one diagnosed as non-verbal.  Years later, he speaks as well as anyone—when he has something to say.

With ASL still fresh in my mind, I was asked to help with the nursery in our ward.  I wondered if their fidgety little hands would better focus on singing if they were signing some of the words as we sang. I taught the nursery children a few signs to use during Singing Time.  Eureka!   They became more focused on singing.  Doing signs helped them remember the words to the songs and helped them keep their hands to themselves.

One of the nursery teachers had an older son who needed to do a service project. She and her family went to a local nursing home and entertained the residents, many of whom were hard of hearing. Doing the signs helped the elderly folks connect to the music and feel the joy of being engaged. It was a wonderful event for the singers and listeners alike.

-Pamela

For related posts, see “Why Sign Language?”

“Music in Nursery: Teaching the Gospel” and

“Music”

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Filed under Music, Nursery, Reaching the One, Special Needs

Autism, Life Threatening Food Allergies and Primary

photo provided by author

photo provided by author

Today’s guest author is DeeDee, a wife and mother of two who loves the temple and loves to be outdoors enjoying nature with her family. See her 3 specific suggestions below about caring for her children in Primary. 

My beautiful son is four years old. He was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder at age 3. My amazing eight-year-old daughter has life threatening (anaphylactic) allergies. Both of these conditions shape our children’s experience in Primary.

What is it like to have a child with autism at church? For me it is wonderfully challenging, but I recognize it’s an opportunity for growth and development, for both me and for my child. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a variable diagnosis. That means each child with ASD has unique strengths and challenges. Before my son was diagnosed he was struggling in nursery. A sentence kept going through my mind at that time, “The one matters.” I know that every child matters to the Lord and belongs in Primary, at church and in other church activities. Figuring out how to make that happen is the challenge.

What is it like having a child with life-threatening anaphylactic allergies at church? Life-threatening allergies are about safety. I want my daughter to be safe at church, in Primary and at church activities. It is scary for me to know that if my child eats a certain food it can result in a life-threatening allergic reaction. This makes church different for me than it was before I had a child with severe food allergies. My husband and I are diligent about constantly checking to see if food is involved at church. Sometimes snacks are given in class or as a reward for performances (like Primary programs). Other times food is used to make crafts, provide service or celebrate holidays. We have strict rules for our daughter about food & washing hands. She is very careful about what she touches and eats at church. My guard is always up to some degree at church because I want her to be safe and have a good experience.

What has helped our family:

1. We take responsibility for our children. My husband and I have learned that it is our responsibility to ensure our children are set up for success in Primary. Simply dropping them off doesn’t work. Our experience has been that things go best when we communicate our children’s unique needs with ward and Primary leadership so we can partner with them in helping our children do well in Primary. My 4-year-old son with autism doesn’t communicate verbally like many children his age. When he was diagnosed I notified our Primary presidency and spoke with his nursery leader about his unique challenges. His wonderful nursery leader did well with him, keeping the classroom calm and encouraging open play that doesn’t require 2-way verbal communication. She speaks to him as she does other children but also gives him gentle nudges to help him as needed. I also shared with her behavioral signs that may suggest he is having a difficult time, when it may be best to include me or my husband. Similarly, my daughter can’t eat nuts. Her life threatening allergic reactions can result in death or serious injury. My husband and I take responsibility for her condition by sharing applicable medical information with Primary leaders and our plan to help her if she has a reaction in Primary. We keep emergency medication near her at all times and ask to approve any food offered her in Primary. We hope that Primary leaders and teachers appreciate the steps we take to educate and include them so they aren’t left to interpret things on their own.

2. Have realistic expectations. We attempt to maintain realistic expectations at church. Church leaders, Primary leaders and teachers are imperfect people, volunteers at best. They make mistakes and can misinterpret things like we all do. A Primary leader may misinterpret my son’s behavior. A teacher may bring a snack my daughter is allergic to and forget to check with us first. These things can happen, and it helps to remind us to keep working with ward and Primary leaders.

3. Listen to the Spirit. Numerous times at church my husband or I have felt prompted to check on one of our children in Primary, sometimes urgently. We recognize these as promptings from Holy Ghost and are very grateful for them.

~DeeDee

 

For related posts, see Special Needs page and

Helping children accept others with special needs

Also see “Accepting Allergies” by Thira Christianson from a kids’ point of view in the Friend magazine, Sept 2011, 18-19.

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Filed under Reaching the One, Special Needs

Helping children accept others with special needs

Today’s guest author Carolyn joins regulars Marjorie, Marci and Michelle for our first four-author post! Carolyn, mother of two children, both with special needs, has worked in the field of special education for over thirteen years. She loves reading and crocheting. She’s attending BYU-I (online) studying Marriage and Family Studies.

lds.org

lds.org

 

How can we help children be empathetic, loving and kind when the behavior of a child with special needs frightens them?

Recently in response to one of our blog posts, we received this superb question: “Samuel is a new boy in our church who has cerebral palsy.  He is in a wheelchair and doesn’t speak.  He often yells out loudly.  My 5 year old can be particularly sensitive to sensory things, and when Samuel yells or cries, it upsets her.  Yesterday as we were leaving church, he yelled out and it scared all of us because it was unexpected.  My daughter’s first response was, ‘I don’t like him.’  We’ve talked about him before, and loving him, but I’m not sure what steps to take next.  Any suggestions?”  

Carolyn: You can’t force a child (or anyone) to be understanding and loving.  And it takes time to teach love and understanding, especially around special needs because it’s just so different from your own reality. This is multi-layered process. You must honor the feelings of ALL the children in Primary. Don’t band aid the situation with the “they are a child of God and we should love them” explanation. While true, that is a really big concept. And it doesn’t honor the fact that the other kids are scared by the screaming, or intimidated by the wheelchair.  So back up a step. 

The ultimate goal is love for this little child, and for them to be included in Primary fellowship as much as possible. But the first step is acceptance.  You can’t move toward understanding and then toward love until you accept the disability and the child with the disability. To teach acceptance, you just have to let people talk about what they feel. The little girl is scared.  That’s okay.  She doesn’t like it when Samuel screams.  Neither do I. She feels angry when he screams?  That’s okay.  She doesn’t want to sit with him?  That’s okay. Behaviors can be good or bad. But ALL feelings are okay. 

But quickly point out that the ACT is scary–not the child.  Screaming is scary.  Samuel is not.  His is a little boy.  As you reinforce this concept, use the same phrasing over and over so that they can remember the sentence.  You might say, “The screaming is scary, but Samuel is our friend” or “The screaming is scary, but Samuel is just a little boy, like other little boys.”  Use that same phrasing each time, and kids will learn through repetition.

Next, remember that even kids with special needs have needs.  They just struggle to communicate.  And when they can’t communicate, sometimes they get frustrated and scream.  Just like we all do!  You might ask “do you sometimes scream when you get frustrated? Samuel does too.”

Ask the parents what they recommend.  How have they taught other kids to understand Samuel’s special needs? Many parents of children with special needs are very open. They want to talk about their child. They are your best resource because they are the experts on their children. Take the time to really get to know the family, visit them in their home, and let them know you are there to support them and their child.

Finally, children take their cues from adults. They are more intuitive, resilient, compassionate, and aware than we think. When the adults around them are comfortable, the children will be comfortable.

Marjorie: One Sunday I took a few minutes to tell the kids about my son who has autism. I made a poster about him with things he liked, such as his iPad and his favorite movies. I talked about things that he had in common with the other kids. I explained about autism and some of his autistic behaviors by asking if any of them twirled their hair, chewed on their pencils, etc. I explained that that was the same thing. Focus on similarities, explain differences, explain what the disability is and why the kids have certain behaviors or have physical needs. Demystifying and normalizing behavior leads to acceptance.

Marci: As I thought about this, I thought of the saying,  “If you don’t love someone, you haven’t served them enough.” Kids CAN serve other kids:

  • Give them a kind note.
  • Draw them a picture.
  • Find out their favorite color, and wear something with that color one day.
  • Pick some wildflowers for them.
  • Or even just make it a point to always say hello and smile.

Michelle: There is always someone who needs a friend.  Perhaps it is someone who is new or lonely or being bullied. And at one time or another that person may be you. The truth is that we are all “poor and needy” in one way or another at different times in our lives. Service is not a one-way linear sort of process. I  see it more as a circular give-and-take sort of cycle.  We need to serve others just as much as we need to receive service.  This ebb and flow of service creates a community of love, mutual respect and empathy for one another.

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Filed under Lesson, Life Lessons, Reaching the One, Special Needs

“An Egg for Everyone” – secret weapons galore

retirerightplanning.com

retirerightplanning.com

This is an excerpt from a book review written by Kate Wangsgard of “Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids,” the book that emerged from this blog. The review was published in the spring 2015 Exponent II magazine, page 35. Read the full review here

Kate loves to cook and eat delicious vegetarian food, plan-over-the-top Halloween parties and go on bike rides with her family. She lives in Cambridge, MA with her soccer-loving husband, moppy-haired 7 year old son and adventurous 1 year old son.

I am currently teaching Sunbeams for the third time in ten years, so I’m willing to try just about anything to keep those wiggly little bums in their chairs. After reading through “Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids,” I found what looked to be a secret weapon in the war against squirmy three-year-olds. Last Sunday I sat down next to my rows of Sunbeams, waiting for the perfect moment to use my new trick. It wasn’t long before one of the kids started hopping out of his chair. So I squatted down in front of him and whispered, “I have a special job for you. I need you to pretend you’re a bird and your chair is an egg that you need to keep warm. Make sure you stay in your chair so your egg stays warm!” His eyes lit up as he settled into his chair with a proud smile. It was working! Throughout the rest of Sharing Time, whenever he stared to get out of his chair, I reminded him of his little egg and he quickly returned to keep it warm. My co-teacher was impressed and I sat back and smugly marveled at my newfound Sunbeam wrangling skills.

Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids” ought to be required reading for anyone serving in Primary. While it is full of clever ideas and tricks like the egg-warming one above, its greatest value lies in the suggestions for sensitively dealing with difficult situations you encounter while teaching children in the Church. The book gives suggestions for how to navigate a lesson on honoring your parents when you know some of your kids don’t have a positive relationship with their parents. It discusses how to deal with bullying and other behavior issues and includes suggestions to reach children of all learning styles or children with special needs. There is a lesson to teach children about the valuable role of women in the Church by introducing them to strong female leaders, past and present. Any efforts to help teach the gospel to the next generation in a more open and loving way gets my vote.

[The book] suggests simple but helpful rules for establishing a smoother running Primary and ways to help the kids learn and remember those rules each week. There are ways to improve Singing Time, Primary training meetings, and suggestions for working with the bishopric on staffing issues. There is also a detailed plan for transitioning new Sunbeams from nursery to Primary.

Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids” is a quick read but will be a great resource to have on hand when you find yourself facing a particularly daunting subject or difficult situation.

– Kate Wangsgard

(Thank you, Kate!)

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Filed under Bullying, Discipline, Lesson, Music, Nursery, Reaching the One, Special Needs, Transitions

Special Needs: Parents and Teachers on the Same Team!

Our guest author today is Jodi, a returned missionary and full-time mom of six children, many with special needs. Even as a little girl Jodi had a natural love for individuals with special needs. Today she is sharing some of her feelings about raising children with special needs in the Church.

I am a mom of six children, all adopted, and special in their own unique ways. The biggest thing that ward members can do to support and help families with special needs is to trust that the parents know best, and not judge.

Trust is so powerful and truly gives the child the best chance at being successful. While leaders of the church receive inspiration for those that they have stewardship over, it is always vital to remember that the parents receive guidance and direction for their children too. Thus parents and church leaders should work together as a team. We have been very blessed to have leaders that trust and support us. We have tried to trust and support them as well.

Erin Anderson Photography

Photo by Erin Anderson Photo & Design

We have two children with Down Syndrome. Daisy is almost five and Leila is three. A Primary worker was called to specifically help watch over and care for our girls while in Nursery. This gave me great peace of mind in leaving them. Our girls choke easily and knowing that there was somebody there just to keep an extra eye on them was a blessing. Also, because of their delay in development there was always somebody there to help them sit on their chair, or carry them to the next activity (they didn’t walk when others walked). These are some of the accommodations that were made for them in Nursery.

When Daisy was the appropriate age for Sunbeams, she was delayed socially and verbally. I asked that Daisy stay in Nursery for one more year.  This is when I appreciated the Primary President’s trust.  Consistency and predictability is huge for all children, but especially those children with special needs. I felt that an extra year in Nursery would serve her well, and it did.

The next year, she really should have been transitioning into Sunbeams, but now we were focusing on building endurance in a classroom setting. Once again, I was grateful to a Primary President who trusts us. Daisy now attends Singing Time in Primary, and then returns to Nursery for the rest of the time. We plan to continually transition her into Sharing Time and class time throughout the year. She’ll be fully participating in Primary by next January.

In addition, some special needs aren’t visually apparent like Down Syndrome. Some children struggle with unseen special needs like anxiety disorders, mental health issues, etc. Our oldest son, who is 14, suffers with Reactive Attachment Disorder. The bishop, Young Men and Scout leaders have been very supportive. They listen to our needs and desires, and make accommodations to best help our son. This has done so much for us and for him.

When ministering to and having stewardship over children that have special needs, the best thing that leaders can do to support the child and family is to trust the parents and to work together as a team, never judging. When we come together as one and focus on the individual we are truly ministering as Christ did by focusing on the worth of each individual soul.

Erin Anderson Photography

Photo by Erin Anderson Photo & Design

 

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Filed under Life Lessons, Nursery, Parent Involvement, Reaching the One, Special Needs, Teacher Support, Transitions

Primary in Zion becomes a book! “Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids”

SundayLessons_Front_RGBIt started with you, our readers. We began this blog and watched in astonishment as it spread all over the world. We dreamed of turning the best posts and other ideas into a book you can take with you to read on the beach or on your couch, to savor the stories and refer to the ideas and helps again and again. We took your favorite Primary in Zion blog posts, invited new voices from other authors, and put them together in a volume called “Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids”.  It is now available on Amazon.com, DeseretBook.com, or wherever LDS books are sold.

Here’s what it’s about: Children. If you’ve ever wished you could send the entire church class into timeout, then basked in the radiance of a child’s face when the Spirit speaks to her spirit, this book is for you. In these pages are memorable stories of the exuberant joy as well as the real-world challenges of working with children. You’ll also find ready-to-use ideas for channeling boundless energy, teaching about ideal families to children who live in other-than-ideal families, staffing challenges, bullying, children’s music for a lifetime, kids with special needs, building a celestial nursery, pint-sized service projects, and behavior management. And you’ll find some of the best children’s lesson enhancements and activities of all time.

Click here for downloadable files of the figures and handouts in the book.

Here’s what they’re saying about this new book:

“Why didn’t I think of that?!” you ask yourself, then gratefully acknowledge: “Thank goodness Marci McPhee did!” With sensitivity to the needs of all children, and love beyond measure for these precious little ones, McPhee lights the way to joyfully leading our children “home.” —Lori Henderson, co-creator of MormonMediaNetwork.com 

 

Learning of my son’s disability and being called to teach Primary were both scary events in their own right. I wasn’t sure how to react to either situation. I wish I had found Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids sooner! This book speaks to both men and women about how to fulfill this special calling. —Marc Buchanan, father and Primary worker 

 

Drawing first-hand examples from thoughtful Latter-day Saints, Marci McPhee has put together a guide that is an engaging, provocative, reassuring, and, importantly, faithful resource for teachers and parents. —Ron Scott, journalist, novelist, and author of “Mitt Romney: An Inside Look at the Man and His Politics” 

 

This is the most honest, heart-warming collection I have read about teaching children. The tips are practical, real-life, and easily adaptable. This book reminds us of the transforming power of viewing children as the Savior did. It will give new vision to leaders, teachers, and parents. —Gladys Farmer, author, mother, and grandmother with many years of Primary experience

Contributing authors:

Julia B. Blake

Jon Forsyth

Lori Forsyth

Char Lyn Grujoski

Kristine Haglund

Danielle Harrell

Roz Hawk

Michelle Henderson

Jackie Herrera

Tina Huntsman

Jenn Iverson

Whitney Johnson

Caroline Jones

Linda Hoffman Kimball

Rebecca Lewis

Brigitte Madrian

David Madrian

Emily Mangum

Marci McPhee

James McQuivey

Megan McQuivey

Michelle Purrington

Helen Claire Sievers

Laura Stowell

Martha Wingate

With special thanks to anonymous contributors.

 

A portion of the proceeds will support immigrant mothers and their children at Waltham Family School in Massachusetts.

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Filed under Activity, Bullying, Discipline, Lesson, Life Lessons, Music, Nursery, Opening Exercises, Overheard in Primary, Parent Involvement, Reaching the One, Sacrament Meeting Presentation, Scouts, Scriptures, Sharing Time, Special Needs, Teacher Support, Transitions

Are you struggling to deal with disruptive behavior in Primary?

Primary can be difficult and literally too long for some children.  In response many children try to escape or get attention by acting out.  There are some easy things to do to help these children and their teachers.

Photo compliments of lds.org

  1. Sometimes they might just need a short break.  If children regularly get restless at a similar time, add an active song, a walk to the drinking fountain or a yoga stretch.
  2. In Sharing Time sit behind or with your class, assign seats; don’t be afraid to not allow certain behavior.  I assure you children do not behave as badly in school as we allow them to in Primary.
  3. Have clear rules and apply them consistently.
  4. Remember that not all teachers are created equal.  Some are much better at redirecting children, having well prepared and engaging lessons and being aware that a child is reaching his limit.  If you have a class that is struggling, consider switching teachers around.
  5. Find someone in the ward who can act as a consultant.  This person can observe a class and make helpful suggestions.
  6. Some children may need an individual aide who can sit with them and help them understand concepts, take them out for a break or help them sit quietly so the teacher can teach.
  7. The teacher should prepare engaging age-appropriate lessons that take the children’s needs into consideration.  Stop for sensory breaks if needed, or have an active activity in the middle of your lesson, read short stories to younger children.  Have clear and consistent rules and a routine they can depend upon.
  8. Make sure they aren’t misbehaving because of something physical.  Make sure the child isn’t sick, that their shoes aren’t too small or that they need a drink but are unable to request help.
  9. Reinforce the behavior you want.

The University of Kentucky has created a short online behavioral therapy course that a teacher or leader could go through in a short amount of time that could help them understand antecedents to undesirable behavior and how to replace it with desirable behavior.

Understanding Behavior: An Interactive Tutorial  “provides a basic introduction to the behavioral model. By understanding and applying the behavioral model, you will increase the likelihood of intervening successfully with problem behaviors.”

~Marjorie

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Filed under Discipline, Reaching the One, Special Needs, Teacher Support

Mastering Classroom Rules: Repetition Without Boredom

Movie_Clapperboard

clker.com

Download the classroom rules poster here (Figure 5). Watch a 4-minute video demonstrating the following ideas here

When I wrote my list of a few easy classroom rules in kid language, I mentioned that I review the rules every week in interactive, varied, fun ways until the kids really get it. Some ask, “How do you do that without boring the children — and yourself?” Before I answer that, here’s a few basic suggestions about classroom management:

* Any child will become wiggly during a lecture-style lesson week after week. Make sure your lessons are varied and actively involve the children. Pull out your copy of Teaching, No Greater Call (or download it here) and add a few new teaching ideas to your bag of tricks. I particularly like Chapter 25 on page 89: “Teaching with Variety.”

* Be consistent, using the same rules and rule numbers. You want the children to eventually memorize them, so at some point one child will look at another child tipping back in his chair and say, “Rule #4 is six legs on the floor.” They can’t do this if you mix up the rules and rule numbers. This isn’t to say you can’t adjust based on needs as you go along, but do try to stick with a few consistent rules. Repetition makes children feel safe; kids like knowing the answers.

Class Rules* Phrase the rules in the positive — the behavior you DO want — rather than the negative. Phrasing a rule in the positive and repeating it often becomes like a goal or an affirmation.

So here’s how I do it. Remember that reviewing the rules is not the lesson itself. Each of these activities should be VERY brief so you can get into the heart of gospel teaching.

Take 1: Read it. Display the rules poster, read the rules. You can simply do this for a week or two.

Take 2: Which rule is missing? Before class, tape blank paper over one rule. Have the children guess which rule is missing. You can repeat this for a few weeks with a different rule missing each time.

Take 3: Example. Post the poster and ask “Show me someone who is obeying Rule #3.” Review the others as needed. (WARNING: DO NOT ask them to show you someone who is NOT obeying a certain rule — you’ll be sorry!) You can repeat this for a few weeks demonstrating a different rule each time.

Take 4: Pictionary. Instead of posting the poster, draw a picture that goes with one of the rules. Children guess what that picture represents. Then post the poster and review the others as needed. You can repeat this for a few weeks, sketching a different rule each time.

Take 5: Choral reading. While you point to each rule, children repeat the rules together as a class.

Take 6: Guessing game. “OK, children, before we begin, let’s have a guessing game. Which rule has to do with our voices? our chairs? our hands?” Then display the rules poster.

Take 7: Charades. Whisper in a child’s ear or give the child a paper with one of the rules on it. The child acts it out while the others guess. Then post the poster. You can repeat this for a few weeks, acting out a different rule each time.

Take 8: Quiz. “Who remembers what Rule #1 is? How about #2?”

Take 9: Why? “Why do you think this rule is important? How does this rule help us?”

Take 10: Children as teachers. If you have visitors or move-ins, ask the children to be the teachers, instructing the new child on the rules for your class. If you have 5 rules, ask 5 children to stand and explain one rule.

Feel free to mix these up — Pictionary for Rule 3 one week, then tape over Rule 5 the next week. You need not review every rule every week, unless the children need it.  You may want to review most frequently the rules the children need most. Not every rule lends itself to each method; for example, it’s hard to act out “Obey the teacher.” Once the children have mastered the rules, feel free to post the poster without comment and go straight into your lesson, reviewing occasionally as needed using one of these methods. 

Then use these rules in the moment. When a child is poking a neighbor, you can quietly say, “Rule #3 – hands to yourself.” And remember to praise the behavior you do want when it occurs.

Finally, we know that rules are not an end in themselves. Setting appropriate classroom rules and making it fun makes children feel safe and loved. As they learn what’s expected and how to achieve it, you create conditions for them to succeed. A reverent child is more likely to feel the Spirit and more likely to get acquainted with the Lord in Primary. In short, mastering classroom rules is to help lead children to the Master.

-Marci

This idea appears in “Sunday Lessons and Activities for Kids,” with downloadable rules poster and other handouts here. Read more about how Primary in Zion became a book by clicking on the book cover below. SundayLessons_Front_RGB

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Filed under Discipline, Special Needs, Teacher Support

Meeting the Needs of Individual Primary Children

Sometimes it is a challenge to think outside the box.  Sometimes the solution is easy, but the answer may not be what you were expecting.  Sometimes it’s as easy as rolling that piano to the back of the room!

I had a conversation with a dear friend recently.  She has a son in Sunbeams who has some special needs.  I asked how he was doing and was thrilled to hear how much his speech had been progressing.  However, I was saddened to hear that Primary has been a struggle for him.  He gets overstimulated by loud noises and his class sits near the piano in the Primary room.  This poor little guy sits in his chair with his hands over his ears saying “That’s too loud!  That’s too loud!” repeatedly. The solution was easy, although it took thinking outside of the box to get to it: move the piano to the back of the room.

Another ward with over 20 new Sunbeams was at a loss for how to keep those Sunbeams in their seats during Sharing Time.  They were sitting on the front row, of course, because that’s where the Sunbeams sit, right?  Well, traditionally, yes.  Someone in their presidency had the genius idea of moving the Sunbeams to the second row.  Having them in the second row created some natural boundaries for them, they were blocked in by a row a chairs and children right in front of them and it was an easy, highly effective solution to their problem, even if it wasn’t “traditional.”

Parents are often the greatest teammate that we forget to involve.  Parents want Primary to be a good experience for their child and others.  Don’t forget to ask them what you can do to help their child have a positive Primary experience.

There are other solutions just waiting to be discovered.  How can we meet the needs of individual Primary children?  Please share your ideas with all of us in the comment section below.

~Michelle

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Filed under Discipline, Life Lessons, Music, Parent Involvement, Reaching the One, Special Needs