For children in imperfect families (that’s all of us!): Encouragement from leaders

Photodisc/Thinkstock via lds.org

Photodisc/Thinkstock via lds.org

Naturally, every family is imperfect. But as we teach children that “families are forever” and “honor thy father and mother,” some children may need to hear a more nuanced message. Here are some messages of encouragement from our leaders that we can incorporate as we teach children true doctrine about families.

Sister Neill F. Marriott, second counselor in the Young Women General Presidency, from from “Parents in Training,” New Era, August 2016, 17.

  • “No matter what kind of home you come from now, you can choose what kind of parent you will be in the future.”
  • “Please don’t expect your family to be perfect — because it will not be. It doesn’t help anyone to dwell on faults and imperfections. Instead, focus on what your family does well. . . . As you strive to become a constant source of goodness, you’ll likely influence your family for the better.”

Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve, from “Fathers,” April 2016 General Conference.

  • “To children whose family situation is troubled, we say, you yourself are no less for that. Challenges are at times an indication of the Lord’s trust in you. He can help you, directly and through others, to deal with what you face. You can become the generation, perhaps the first in your family, where the divine patterns that God has ordained for families truly take shape and bless all the generations after you.”
  • “Wherever you rank your own father [or mother] on the scale of good-better-best (and I predict that ranking will go higher as you grow older and wiser), make up your mind to honor him and your mother by your own life. Your righteousness is the greatest honor any [parent] can receive.”

Also see other related posts:

Honoring parents – even if parents make poor choices?

Father’s Day – sensitive, but where else will they learn?

-Marci

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Filed under Lesson, Life Lessons, Sharing Time

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